Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Advocacy


What is Advocacy?

Advocacy is speaking in support of a person or an issue
Advocacy supports human rights
Advocacy is NOT case work, support work, self interest, mediation, conciliation,  counseling, or a means to achieving an individuals agenda and/or receiving a personal or financial benefit.

What is Inclusion?

Inclusion is full participation in the community
What is Transparency?

Transparency, as used in science, engineering, business, the humanities and in other social contexts, implies openness, communication, and accountability. Transparency is operating in such a way that it is easy for others to see what actions are performed.

Advocacy is having someone or group to stand beside you and with you if you think something is unfair or that someone is treating you badly and you would like to do something to change it.
An Advocate will:

• Listen to you
• Identify the issues they can help with
• Provide you with information
• Stand beside you so that you can be heard
• Assist you to solve your issues yourself
• Refer you to other organisations if necessary



There are three components to a successful facilitated advocacy plan:

Structure: Create a structure that establishes an ongoing advocacy program for health care policy relating to our medical cannabis program.

An organization's advocacy operations should include; specific goals, accountability, inclusion of its community and action plans. .

Relationships: Develop ongoing relationships with critical policymakers and key community leaders.

Action: Put your structure and relationships to work.

What is Exclusive? (per merriam-webster)
1a :  excluding or having power to exclude
b :  limiting or limited to possession, control, or use by a single individual or group
2a :  excluding others from participation
b :  snobbishly aloof
3a :  accepting or soliciting only a socially restricted patronage (as of the upper class)
b :  stylish, fashionable
c :  restricted in distribution, use, or appeal because of expense

“Exclusive” originated in the late 15th century (as a noun denoting something that excludes or causes exclusion): from medieval Latin: exclusivus, and from Latin: excludere ‘shut out’

“Advocacy” originated from late Middle English: via Old French from medieval Latin: advocatia, and from advocare ‘summon, call to one's aid’

When Advocacy & Inclusion are combined and put into Action = >  the results reach the Entire Community.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Teen Drug Abuse Decline Continues


The 2016 Monitoring the Future annual survey results has been released from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the study reflects changing teen behaviors and choices about drugs in a social media-infused world. The results show a continued long-term decline in the use of many illicit substances, including cannabis as well as alcohol, tobacco, and misuse of some prescription medications. The survey measures drug use and attitudes among eighth, 10th, and 12th graders, and is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse is part of the NIH.

The MTF survey, the only large-scale federal youth survey on substance use that releases findings the same year the data is collected and has been conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor since 1975.  Findings from the survey indicate that past year use of any illicit drug is down from recent peaks in all three grade levels.

What the study shows is how cannabis use in the past month among eighth graders dropped significantly in 2016 to 5.4 percent, from 6.5 percent in 2015. Daily use among eighth graders dropped in 2016 to 0.7 percent from 1.1 percent in 2015. However, among high school seniors, 22.5 percent report past month marijuana use and 6 percent report daily use; both measures remained relatively stable from last year. Similarly, rates of cannabis use in the past year among 10th graders also remained stable compared to 2015, but are at their lowest levels in over two decades.

National surveys have continued to show that teen cannabis use rates are falling across the country. Federal data released late last year showed that teen use rates in Colorado and Washington were essentially flat, they covered 2014, the first year commercial cannabis was available in those states. Rates of cannabis use among Colorado's teenagers are essentially unchanged in the years since the state's voters legalized cannabis in 2012, new survey data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment shows this. The survey was based on a random sample of 17,000 middle and high school students in Colorado. Levels of teen use in Colorado have not increased since it ended cannabis prohibition, and they are lower than the national average.
California where medical cannabis has been legal for many years in an unregulated environment and now has been legalized with the passage of AUMA , cannabis use there in teens has also remained less prevalent than the years before the cannabis had been made legal according to results from the 13th Biennial California Student Survey.
Studies like these continue to debunk the theory that making medical cannabis legal and the legalization of commercial cannabis for adults will result in more teen use.  Another study published in The Lancet Psychiatry showed no significant difference in adolescent cannabis use in the states with medical cannabis laws. This exhaustive study using over 24 years of data from over a million teenagers in 48 states found no evidence that legalized medical cannabis led to teenagers using cannabis more. Cannabis has been the consistently most available drug since 1975 where 81% of teens said they could get it, moving up to 90% now. However, being about to get it and wanting to use it are two different things.  In fact, states with legal cannabis are seeing a decline in all types of illicit drugs abused by teens - maybe this is a new component to the entourage effect.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Roundhouse Update



Tuesday, March 14th, at the Roundhouse in Santa Fe, legislators will be busy with several bills that could affect the medical cannabis program:  SB-177 “Medical Marijuana Changes” on the agenda for the House Judiciary Committee,  SB-258 “Decrease Marijuana Penalties” in House Consumer & Public Affairs Committee, and HB-527 “Medical Marijuana Changes in Senate Public Affairs Committee.

In the Call For Action, this article will have details on all these bills on the agenda for today and how you can have your voice heard by emailing, calling the Roundhouse, and calling your legislator. In this Call For Action, having your voice heard by doing both, emailing and calling legislators will provide a stronger impact on getting the message across.

SB-177 “Medical Marijuana Changes” in House Judiciary Committee at 8 am in Room 307

Committee Members

Title
Name
Party
Role
Representative
D
Chair
Representative
D
Vice Chair
Representative
D
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
D
Member
Representative
D
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
D
Member
Representative
D
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
R
Member



SB-258 “Decrease Marijuana Penalties” in House Consumer & Public Affairs Committee Tuesday, March 14, 2017  -  1:30 pm  -  Room 309

Committee Members
Title
Name
Party
Role
Representative
D
Chair
Representative
D
Vice Chair
Representative
D
Member
Representative
R
Member
Representative
R
Member



HB-527 “Medical Marijuana Changes in Senate Public Affairs Committee, Tuesday, March 14, 2017 -  Room 321

Committee Members

Title
Name
Party
Role
Senator
D
Chair
Senator
D
Vice Chair
Senator
R
Member
Senator
R
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
D
Member
Senator
R
Ranking Member


Call For Action: Call and email your Senator and House of Representative member - call the Roundhouse for your voice to be heard.

Senate Chamber main phone 505-986-4714 and general email: senate@nmlegis.gov

House of Representatives main phone number 505-986-4751 and general email: house@nmlegis.gov